The work conditions in border agencies need to be taken carefully into consideration with focus on a safe and fair work environment, including adequate accommodation and appropriate salary scales.

The work conditions in border agencies need to be taken carefully into consideration with focus on a safe and fair work environment, including adequate accommodation and appropriate salary scales.

The work conditions in border agencies need to be taken carefully into consideration with focus on a safe and fair work environment, including adequate accommodation and appropriate salary scales.

The work conditions in border agencies need to be taken carefully into consideration with focus on a safe and fair work environment, including adequate accommodation and appropriate salary scales.

This should occur ideally through a dedicated unit gathering information and disseminating it to all relevant staff.

This should cover the following fields: legal and regular framework; institutional framework; procedures; human resources training; communication and information exchange; infrastructure and equipment.

This should occur ideally through a dedicated unit gathering information and disseminating it to all relevant staff.

This should cover the following fields: legal and regular framework; institutional framework; procedures; human resources training; communication and information exchange; infrastructure and equipment.

This should occur ideally through a dedicated unit gathering information and disseminating it to all relevant staff.

This should cover the following fields: legal and regular framework; institutional framework; procedures; human resources training; communication and information exchange; infrastructure and equipment.

This should occur ideally through a dedicated unit gathering information and disseminating it to all relevant staff.

This should cover the following fields: legal and regular framework; institutional framework; procedures; human resources training; communication and information exchange; infrastructure and equipment.

The agreements must clarify: the institutional framework of the relevant national agencies allowing for active bilateral and multilateral relations; harmonised procedures at the BCPs of neighbouring countries; and the existence and proper functioning of coordination and cooperation processes between the key national actors in this area and their counterparts in neighbouring countries, countries of origin and final destination of migrants and international and regional organisations.

The agreements must clarify how undocumented migrants will be identified and documented, the return and readmission of irregular migrants, arrangements for legal labor migration, and the reintegration of returnees.

Forced return should be carried out on the basis of readmission agreements, which would include: readmission of own nationals, third-country nationals and stateless persons; a prohibition against return of persons to countries where they would risk persecution or ill-treatment; means of identifying persons to be readmitted; designation of authorities responsible for reception of returned migrants; and time-limits for reply to a request by a contracting party.

The agreements must clarify: the institutional framework of the relevant national agencies allowing for active bilateral and multilateral relations; harmonised procedures at the BCPs of neighbouring countries; and the existence and proper functioning of coordination and cooperation processes between the key national actors in this area and their counterparts in neighbouring countries, countries of origin and final destination of migrants and international and regional organisations.

The agreements must clarify how undocumented migrants will be identified and documented, the return and readmission of irregular migrants, arrangements for legal labor migration, and the reintegration of returnees.

Forced return should be carried out on the basis of readmission agreements, which would include: readmission of own nationals, third-country nationals and stateless persons; a prohibition against return of persons to countries where they would risk persecution or ill-treatment; means of identifying persons to be readmitted; designation of authorities responsible for reception of returned migrants; and time-limits for reply to a request by a contracting party.

The agreements must clarify: the institutional framework of the relevant national agencies allowing for active bilateral and multilateral relations; harmonised procedures at the BCPs of neighbouring countries; and the existence and proper functioning of coordination and cooperation processes between the key national actors in this area and their counterparts in neighbouring countries, countries of origin and final destination of migrants and international and regional organisations.

The agreements must clarify how undocumented migrants will be identified and documented, the return and readmission of irregular migrants, arrangements for legal labor migration, and the reintegration of returnees.

Forced return should be carried out on the basis of readmission agreements, which would include: readmission of own nationals, third-country nationals and stateless persons; a prohibition against return of persons to countries where they would risk persecution or ill-treatment; means of identifying persons to be readmitted; designation of authorities responsible for reception of returned migrants; and time-limits for reply to a request by a contracting party.

The agreements must clarify: the institutional framework of the relevant national agencies allowing for active bilateral and multilateral relations; harmonised procedures at the BCPs of neighbouring countries; and the existence and proper functioning of coordination and cooperation processes between the key national actors in this area and their counterparts in neighbouring countries, countries of origin and final destination of migrants and international and regional organisations.

The agreements must clarify how undocumented migrants will be identified and documented, the return and readmission of irregular migrants, arrangements for legal labor migration, and the reintegration of returnees.

Forced return should be carried out on the basis of readmission agreements, which would include: readmission of own nationals, third-country nationals and stateless persons; a prohibition against return of persons to countries where they would risk persecution or ill-treatment; means of identifying persons to be readmitted; designation of authorities responsible for reception of returned migrants; and time-limits for reply to a request by a contracting party.

The right to life and physical integrity of persons should be respected at all times - including during expulsion - and they should not be subjected to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.

In the performance of their duty, law enforcement officials shall respect and protect human dignity and maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons.

Non-discrimination legislative provisions ensuring all individuals are treated equally before the law, regardless of nationality, ethnicity, religion or other should be applicable to all migration management and border governance measures at international borders.

Basic needs and welfare should be provided to all individuals including sufficient accommodation facilities and health services in accordance with the needs and status of migrants (reception, detention, centres for foreigners, asylum-seekers and refugees).

Individuals enjoy the fundamental right to have their personal data protected in accordance with national and international legislation and principles. Consequently, the use, allocation, sharing and storage of personal data have to be regulated by national data protection laws.

The right to life and physical integrity of persons should be respected at all times - including during expulsion - and they should not be subjected to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.

In the performance of their duty, law enforcement officials shall respect and protect human dignity and maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons.

Non-discrimination legislative provisions ensuring all individuals are treated equally before the law, regardless of nationality, ethnicity, religion or other should be applicable to all migration management and border governance measures at international borders.

Basic needs and welfare should be provided to all individuals including sufficient accommodation facilities and health services in accordance with the needs and status of migrants (reception, detention, centres for foreigners, asylum-seekers and refugees).

Individuals enjoy the fundamental right to have their personal data protected in accordance with national and international legislation and principles. Consequently, the use, allocation, sharing and storage of personal data have to be regulated by national data protection laws.

The right to life and physical integrity of persons should be respected at all times - including during expulsion - and they should not be subjected to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.

In the performance of their duty, law enforcement officials shall respect and protect human dignity and maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons.

Non-discrimination legislative provisions ensuring all individuals are treated equally before the law, regardless of nationality, ethnicity, religion or other should be applicable to all migration management and border governance measures at international borders.

Basic needs and welfare should be provided to all individuals including sufficient accommodation facilities and health services in accordance with the needs and status of migrants (reception, detention, centres for foreigners, asylum-seekers and refugees).

Individuals enjoy the fundamental right to have their personal data protected in accordance with national and international legislation and principles. Consequently, the use, allocation, sharing and storage of personal data have to be regulated by national data protection laws.

The right to life and physical integrity of persons should be respected at all times - including during expulsion - and they should not be subjected to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.

In the performance of their duty, law enforcement officials shall respect and protect human dignity and maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons.

Non-discrimination legislative provisions ensuring all individuals are treated equally before the law, regardless of nationality, ethnicity, religion or other should be applicable to all migration management and border governance measures at international borders.

Basic needs and welfare should be provided to all individuals including sufficient accommodation facilities and health services in accordance with the needs and status of migrants (reception, detention, centres for foreigners, asylum-seekers and refugees).

Individuals enjoy the fundamental right to have their personal data protected in accordance with national and international legislation and principles. Consequently, the use, allocation, sharing and storage of personal data have to be regulated by national data protection laws.

The number of immigration violations which are considered cause for deportation should be limited to serious immigration violations.

Aliens subject to expulsion and deportation should have access to legal counsel and, under certain circumstances, legal aid.

Persons subject to expulsion have the right to submit the reasons he or she should not be expelled and to have his or her case reviewed by the competent authority. The execution of expulsion decisions sould be suspended pending review.

Persons (including rejected asylum-seekers) who risk to be exposed to serious human rights violations or serious harm upon return to another country should not be subjected to expulsion, deportation or extradition (principle of non-refoulement).

Migrants should be informed about available remedies against negative decisions on expulsion and deportation.

Irregular migrants should be granted a formal status and issued documentation of that status.

It may be considered to assign deportation cases to specialised judges or to create specialised immigration courts, such as those existing in some other countries.

In the case of expulsion, the person concerned shall be informed without delay of his or her right to have recourse to the protection and assistance of the consular or diplomatic authorities of the State of origin, and the authorities of the expelling State shall facilitate the exercise of such right.

The number of immigration violations which are considered cause for deportation should be limited to serious immigration violations.

Aliens subject to expulsion and deportation should have access to legal counsel and, under certain circumstances, legal aid.

Persons subject to expulsion have the right to submit the reasons he or she should not be expelled and to have his or her case reviewed by the competent authority. The execution of expulsion decisions sould be suspended pending review.

Persons (including rejected asylum-seekers) who risk to be exposed to serious human rights violations or serious harm upon return to another country should not be subjected to expulsion, deportation or extradition (principle of non-refoulement).

Migrants should be informed about available remedies against negative decisions on expulsion and deportation.

Irregular migrants should be granted a formal status and issued documentation of that status.

It may be considered to assign deportation cases to specialised judges or to create specialised immigration courts, such as those existing in some other countries.

In the case of expulsion, the person concerned shall be informed without delay of his or her right to have recourse to the protection and assistance of the consular or diplomatic authorities of the State of origin, and the authorities of the expelling State shall facilitate the exercise of such right.

The number of immigration violations which are considered cause for deportation should be limited to serious immigration violations.

Aliens subject to expulsion and deportation should have access to legal counsel and, under certain circumstances, legal aid.

Persons subject to expulsion have the right to submit the reasons he or she should not be expelled and to have his or her case reviewed by the competent authority. The execution of expulsion decisions sould be suspended pending review.

Persons (including rejected asylum-seekers) who risk to be exposed to serious human rights violations or serious harm upon return to another country should not be subjected to expulsion, deportation or extradition (principle of non-refoulement).

Migrants should be informed about available remedies against negative decisions on expulsion and deportation.

Irregular migrants should be granted a formal status and issued documentation of that status.

It may be considered to assign deportation cases to specialised judges or to create specialised immigration courts, such as those existing in some other countries.

In the case of expulsion, the person concerned shall be informed without delay of his or her right to have recourse to the protection and assistance of the consular or diplomatic authorities of the State of origin, and the authorities of the expelling State shall facilitate the exercise of such right.

The number of immigration violations which are considered cause for deportation should be limited to serious immigration violations.

Aliens subject to expulsion and deportation should have access to legal counsel and, under certain circumstances, legal aid.

Persons subject to expulsion have the right to submit the reasons he or she should not be expelled and to have his or her case reviewed by the competent authority. The execution of expulsion decisions sould be suspended pending review.

Persons (including rejected asylum-seekers) who risk to be exposed to serious human rights violations or serious harm upon return to another country should not be subjected to expulsion, deportation or extradition (principle of non-refoulement).

Migrants should be informed about available remedies against negative decisions on expulsion and deportation.

Irregular migrants should be granted a formal status and issued documentation of that status.

It may be considered to assign deportation cases to specialised judges or to create specialised immigration courts, such as those existing in some other countries.

In the case of expulsion, the person concerned shall be informed without delay of his or her right to have recourse to the protection and assistance of the consular or diplomatic authorities of the State of origin, and the authorities of the expelling State shall facilitate the exercise of such right.

A person may only be detained, with a view to ensuring that an expulsion order will be executed, if this is in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law. Detention may be ordered in particular when there is a risk of absconding or the alien concerned avoids or hampers the preparation of return or the removal process.

The rights of persons with special needs should be recognized, including unaccompanied elderly persons, children, single women, torture and trauma victims and persons with physical and mental disabilities.

As a general rule, asylum seekers should not be detained. The position of asylum seekers differs fundamentally from that of the ordinary alien and this element should be taken into account in determining any measures of punishment or detention based on illegal presence or entry.
Detention should not impede the exercise of an asylum-seeker’s right to pursue an application for asylum.

Long-term resident migrants whose situation in the country becomes irregular and who are consequently subject to expulsion should not be detained.

A person may only be detained, with a view to ensuring that an expulsion order will be executed, if this is in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law. Detention may be ordered in particular when there is a risk of absconding or the alien concerned avoids or hampers the preparation of return or the removal process.

The rights of persons with special needs should be recognized, including unaccompanied elderly persons, children, single women, torture and trauma victims and persons with physical and mental disabilities.

As a general rule, asylum seekers should not be detained. The position of asylum seekers differs fundamentally from that of the ordinary alien and this element should be taken into account in determining any measures of punishment or detention based on illegal presence or entry.
Detention should not impede the exercise of an asylum-seeker’s right to pursue an application for asylum.

Long-term resident migrants whose situation in the country becomes irregular and who are consequently subject to expulsion should not be detained.

A person may only be detained, with a view to ensuring that an expulsion order will be executed, if this is in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law. Detention may be ordered in particular when there is a risk of absconding or the alien concerned avoids or hampers the preparation of return or the removal process.

The rights of persons with special needs should be recognized, including unaccompanied elderly persons, children, single women, torture and trauma victims and persons with physical and mental disabilities.

As a general rule, asylum seekers should not be detained. The position of asylum seekers differs fundamentally from that of the ordinary alien and this element should be taken into account in determining any measures of punishment or detention based on illegal presence or entry.
Detention should not impede the exercise of an asylum-seeker’s right to pursue an application for asylum.

Long-term resident migrants whose situation in the country becomes irregular and who are consequently subject to expulsion should not be detained.

A person may only be detained, with a view to ensuring that an expulsion order will be executed, if this is in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law. Detention may be ordered in particular when there is a risk of absconding or the alien concerned avoids or hampers the preparation of return or the removal process.

The rights of persons with special needs should be recognized, including unaccompanied elderly persons, children, single women, torture and trauma victims and persons with physical and mental disabilities.

As a general rule, asylum seekers should not be detained. The position of asylum seekers differs fundamentally from that of the ordinary alien and this element should be taken into account in determining any measures of punishment or detention based on illegal presence or entry.
Detention should not impede the exercise of an asylum-seeker’s right to pursue an application for asylum.

Long-term resident migrants whose situation in the country becomes irregular and who are consequently subject to expulsion should not be detained.

All asylum-seekers, in whatever manner they arrive within the jurisdiction of a State, should have access to procedures to adjudicate their claim which are fair and non-discriminatory.

There should be a clearly identified single, central specialized authority with responsibility for examining requests for refugee status and taking a decision in the first instance.

Asylum-seekers should receive guidance and advice on the procedure and have access to legal counsel.

Asylum-seekers should have access to qualified and impartial interpreters where necessary.

Asylum-seekers should have access to and the right to contact UNHCR and recognized NGOs.

Examination of applications for refugee status should in the first instance allow for a personal interview, if possible before the decision-makers of the competent body.

There should be special procedures and training to enable the sensitive and flexible handling of claims involving asylum-seekers with special needs, including victims of torture or sexual violence.

They should never be refused entry or returned at the point of entry or subjected to detailed interviews by immigration authorities at the point of entry.
Interviews should be carried out by specially trained personnel and unaccompanied or separated children should never be detained for immigration.

All applicants should receive a written decision automatically. If the claim is rejected the decision should be a reasoned.

All applicants should have the right to an independent appeal or review against a negative decision.

All asylum-seekers, in whatever manner they arrive within the jurisdiction of a State, should have access to procedures to adjudicate their claim which are fair and non-discriminatory.

There should be a clearly identified single, central specialized authority with responsibility for examining requests for refugee status and taking a decision in the first instance.

Asylum-seekers should receive guidance and advice on the procedure and have access to legal counsel.

Asylum-seekers should have access to qualified and impartial interpreters where necessary.

Asylum-seekers should have access to and the right to contact UNHCR and recognized NGOs.

Examination of applications for refugee status should in the first instance allow for a personal interview, if possible before the decision-makers of the competent body.

There should be special procedures and training to enable the sensitive and flexible handling of claims involving asylum-seekers with special needs, including victims of torture or sexual violence.

They should never be refused entry or returned at the point of entry or subjected to detailed interviews by immigration authorities at the point of entry.
Interviews should be carried out by specially trained personnel and unaccompanied or separated children should never be detained for immigration.

All applicants should receive a written decision automatically. If the claim is rejected the decision should be a reasoned.

All applicants should have the right to an independent appeal or review against a negative decision.

All asylum-seekers, in whatever manner they arrive within the jurisdiction of a State, should have access to procedures to adjudicate their claim which are fair and non-discriminatory.

There should be a clearly identified single, central specialized authority with responsibility for examining requests for refugee status and taking a decision in the first instance.

Asylum-seekers should receive guidance and advice on the procedure and have access to legal counsel.

Asylum-seekers should have access to qualified and impartial interpreters where necessary.

Asylum-seekers should have access to and the right to contact UNHCR and recognized NGOs.

Examination of applications for refugee status should in the first instance allow for a personal interview, if possible before the decision-makers of the competent body.

There should be special procedures and training to enable the sensitive and flexible handling of claims involving asylum-seekers with special needs, including victims of torture or sexual violence.

They should never be refused entry or returned at the point of entry or subjected to detailed interviews by immigration authorities at the point of entry.
Interviews should be carried out by specially trained personnel and unaccompanied or separated children should never be detained for immigration.

All applicants should receive a written decision automatically. If the claim is rejected the decision should be a reasoned.

All applicants should have the right to an independent appeal or review against a negative decision.

All asylum-seekers, in whatever manner they arrive within the jurisdiction of a State, should have access to procedures to adjudicate their claim which are fair and non-discriminatory.

There should be a clearly identified single, central specialized authority with responsibility for examining requests for refugee status and taking a decision in the first instance.

Asylum-seekers should receive guidance and advice on the procedure and have access to legal counsel.

Asylum-seekers should have access to qualified and impartial interpreters where necessary.

Asylum-seekers should have access to and the right to contact UNHCR and recognized NGOs.

Examination of applications for refugee status should in the first instance allow for a personal interview, if possible before the decision-makers of the competent body.

There should be special procedures and training to enable the sensitive and flexible handling of claims involving asylum-seekers with special needs, including victims of torture or sexual violence.

They should never be refused entry or returned at the point of entry or subjected to detailed interviews by immigration authorities at the point of entry.
Interviews should be carried out by specially trained personnel and unaccompanied or separated children should never be detained for immigration.

All applicants should receive a written decision automatically. If the claim is rejected the decision should be a reasoned.

All applicants should have the right to an independent appeal or review against a negative decision.

Corruption should be criminalized in the penal code, which should include a clear definition of the crime in a national context, a comprehensive listing of which activities constitute corruption, and effective, proportionate and dissuasive sanctions for corruption offences.

Corruption should be criminalized in the penal code, which should include a clear definition of the crime in a national context, a comprehensive listing of which activities constitute corruption, and effective, proportionate and dissuasive sanctions for corruption offences.

Corruption should be criminalized in the penal code, which should include a clear definition of the crime in a national context, a comprehensive listing of which activities constitute corruption, and effective, proportionate and dissuasive sanctions for corruption offences.

Corruption should be criminalized in the penal code, which should include a clear definition of the crime in a national context, a comprehensive listing of which activities constitute corruption, and effective, proportionate and dissuasive sanctions for corruption offences.